Meet Chelsea Fietsgodin, The First Transgender BMX Rider.

The Come Up Interview 7

On Thursday, May 22nd I woke up to a few dozen unread messages in the TCU group chat concerning a video of a female rider named Chelsea Fietsgodin. I watched it and I agreed with the consensus which had already formed in our chat; Chelsea was something special. I’ve seen plenty of talented girl riders over the years but Chelsea was blasting airs and bunnyhopping over rails, things that women have traditionally had a hard time with. I was impressed. But I watch videos of good bike riding all the time, so I quickly moved on with my day and tapped over to my inbox where I read a text that served to complicate matters:

“Yo, just so you know that chick is a dude”

I checked Chelsea’s video again, but this time I took the time to read the comments and I saw that the question of Chelsea’s gender had been brought up in a rather crude fashion there as well. The BMX community is not renowned for it’s open mindedness. While the outside world has spent the last few years grappling with gay football players and gay-friendly presidents, the conversation has yet to trickle down into BMX. And that’s too bad. We all like to think of ourselves as part of an open minded, progressive community but I doubt it seems that way to a confused kid on the outside looking in.

I’ve talked to Chelsea every day since I saw that video and I can confirm that not only is she a talented bike rider, she’s also remarkably intelligent and passionate. Despite all that, she’s fucking scared. She has no idea what the reaction to this interview will be. But she also realizes that this is a conversation that needs to happen in BMX sooner or later and she seems happy to be the first one through the wall. Ladies, gentlemen (and everyone in between), I present you with Chelsea Fietsgodin.

What’s your name and where are you from?

I’m Chelsea Fietsgodin. For the clever commenter who noticed that my last name is Dutch for “bikegoddess”, you’re very right. I’ve been using a made up last name for a bit because I wasn’t comfortable with a lot of people knowing who I was. Since it had to be made up anyways I figured I’d make it good haha. Currently I’m living in Orlando, Florida for college.

How old are you and what do you study?

I just turned 21 on Cinco de Mayo and I’m a Political Science major.

How did you get into BMX?

I followed the Aitken/Foster/Marino model of being a racer turned freestyler. My family and I were driving to the hardware store to prepare for a hurricane and we saw that the Okeeheelee BMX track was open that night. We stopped and asked questions about how to start and my brother and I were out on bikes the following week. Fast forward a few years when all of my friends got “play bikes” and I wanted to join the fun, so I found an old Mongoose in the trash and drilled holes in it to take the weight down. A few weeks after seeing that I was pretty into the whole freestyle thing my parents got me a heavy race bike for my 15th birthday. I got hooked on freestyle right away because I love the non-competitive side of it and how free you are to ride how you want, but I do still race quite a bit as well.

The Come Up Interview 5

What are your thoughts on the women’s BMX scene? It seems like it’s been growing quite a bit the past few years.

I’m so excited with how much we’ve grown, progressed, and gained acceptance recently. I think the acceptance has come mostly within the last year or so; sure there were a handful of people that were supportive before, but as far as mass acceptance and BMX media goes that kind of just happened. The January 2014 issue of BMX Plus! had a blurb in the editorial section that mocked Nina Buitrago by saying that the new guy that DK added to their team was because they needed another girl on the team as if calling him a girl was an insult, but then the February issue came out with Caroline Buchanan on the cover and Nina with a full page photo inside. It was quite the about face and since then I’ve been seeing more positive coverage for women in other magazines. This is huge because prior to this almost all of our coverage came from media that was made by women and published in small outlets and the larger BMX community was able to ignore us. Now that we’re getting into the biggest BMX media outlets that everyone consumes they’re going to be seeing more of us and with that comes more acceptance and support. The positive representation also encourages more women and girls to start riding in the first place because they see that BMX is for them too. For the first 4 years of riding freestyle I never got to ride with another girl rider except for my mom and sister and a chance encounter with Angie Marino at a park, but now I know of 4 other girls just in the central Florida area that ride. I hear the Austin, Texas scene is blowing up for us and since I started filming for this edit I’ve been reached out to by a bunch of girls from Central and South America. Then with more girls riding comes more progression as we push each other to ride better. Just like there are random dudes popping up with banger edits that you’ve never heard of, I was on Facebook yesterday and came across a video of a girl that I’ve never heard of perfectly flipping a box jump in a contest run. This has all been a long time coming so I’m really happy that it’s finally coming about.

That’s rad. So I’ve gotta ask, there were a few comments left on your video about your gender. I know this is a complicated issue for you to explain and not something that a lot of people fully understand. How do you describe your gender?

I wanna start off by saying that it’s amazing how quickly a few people started shouting stuff about me being a man because I can ride a bike well and I’ve got strong legs (which shockingly, happens when you ride bikes every day). That says a lot about what they think of women riders. They can’t let us have success so they try to take our accomplishments as their own, in this case by misgendering me. I see this happening for cisgender (when one’s gender is the same as the gender that was assigned at birth) women athletes as well. However, I am a transgender woman. This doesn’t mean that I was “BORN A MAN!!!!1!” as was so eloquently stated by a few commenters; I was born a baby, just like everyone else. Without getting too complicated because you could get a degree on this topic, as soon as we’re born we begin the process of gendering. Some things are for boys, some things are for girls, and non-binary genders don’t exist apparently. Through socialization based on a binary biological sex system (which is also inaccurate because sex is a combination of many spectrums, not a binary “this or that”, but that’s a whole other degree haha) we’re conditioned to like certain things, act in a certain way, and based on this we’re all confined to narrow gender boxes that aren’t that fun when you stop to think about it. They’re especially not fun for women because while men are socialized to be strong, powerful, and dominating, women are socialized to be weak, dainty, and submissive. This is where the notion that a woman can’t have strong legs comes from because obviously if a woman is strong, that means she’s a man, right? Hopefully my sarcasm translates well haha. Being transgender means that your gender does not match the one that you were assigned at birth based on your biological sex. It’s an extremely complicated topic and there are many different feelings in the transgender community as to what being transgender means and how we know that we are our genders, which is also affected by everyone’s personal perspectives, but to me being transgender means that I was born to be a baby girl but socialized as a baby boy until I was about 12. At this point is when I realized that I wasn’t a boy but due to trans erasure I didn’t know that it was entirely possible that I was a girl until I became educated on the topic by a friend when I was 17. Up until that point however I was extremely uncomfortable and distraught with my gender, so once I started transitioning I began to feel a lot more comfortable with myself. Obviously being misgendered by people commenting on my video is pretty painful as it tells me that to them, I am not a woman. It brings back all those old feelings of gender dysphoria (which is the opposite of euphoria, to give you an idea of how toxic these feelings are) that I was able to dispel from my own mind by making my gender presentation match my gender identity, which is something that cisgender people get to take for granted as no one denies them the validity of their gender identity. The other thing that misgendering someone does is dehumanizes them, making it possible for the larger group to excuse actions taken against them. So to describe my gender, it is nothing special; I am a woman.

The Come Up Interview 4

I’m assuming you’ve been dealing with questions about your gender and trying to find ways to explain to people for years. Do you find that it’s just incredibly difficult to explain your gender to people or have you figured out ways to talk about it to people who aren’t educated about that kind of thing?

I’ve definitely figured out ways to answer these questions because after years of doing it you learn the strings. On the same token though getting asked the same questions over and over again gets tedious so I’ve also learned to identify when someone is asking because they’re genuinely curious or when they’re asking because they’re trying to trip me up. The latter ones I just ignore now haha.

There’s a pervasive idea in BMX that men are good at riding and women just aren’t as strong or as physically capable and as a result it seems like some of the commenters feel you’re “cheating”. How do you feel about that? Is that a feeling you’ve seen expressed by other female riders?

That’s definitely my greatest concern with releasing this edit and letting my riding become known. For a long time I had internalized the belief that I would be cheating so I just kept to myself and never released any kind of media of myself riding. Moving past this sexist and cissexist (anti transgender discrimination) notion took a combination of support from other girl riders and analyzing where those thoughts came from. Outside of BMX transmisogyny is very prevalent in feminism and it’s incredible how quickly cis feminists can go from “we can do anything that men can!” to “you have an unfair advantage!” when a trans woman does it. So far I’ve only seen one female rider have a problem with me out of the many that know that I am a trans woman and she is a bit older so it could just be that these concepts are of a younger generation and she needs time to process the new ideas. Hopefully that’s the case because there are even older women riders that have gone out of their way to support me and she was someone that I looked up to.

Aside from the one lady though so far the only people Against Me (shout out to puns) riding are dudes who are only affected by this in that women’s riding is getting pushed that much closer to the level that men’s riding is at. So that makes you have to wonder, are they up in arms because they’re white knighting and want to protect the fragile little ladies or are they trying to cover themselves because they’re worried that women are getting ever closer to being just as good as them? Either way men being against my riding is problematic because the first scenario paints cisgender women as incapable of riding at a high level and in need of protecting while the second scenario is pretty obviously oppressive haha.

For other women and girls however I can definitely understand where feeling cheated could come from. As I mentioned earlier we’re socialized to behave differently and that socialization runs so deep into our subconsciousness that it has resulted in physical differences. This goes back to women being called men because they’re muscular, that strength is considered a masculine trait and that a strong woman is really just a man (and that a weak male is feminine, which has a negative connotation). As a result most women either subconsciously or intentionally prevent themselves from building up muscle mass and this is said to be genetically inherent. However the fact of the matter is that women can be strong, men can be weak, and gender or sex doesn’t have to play a role in this.

As an example of sex being a spectrum and not a binary system, compare my body to someone like Stevie Churchills; we were both assigned male at birth, but look at how much muscle mass he has compared to me. Then look at Amanda Carr for example, I’m pretty sure she is stronger than I am despite the fact that she was assigned female at birth. She and I are both strong because we spend countless hours building our strength so we can be better at our sports. I don’t have strong legs because I was “BORN A MAN!!!!!” but because I ride my bike to work and school 7 days a week on top of riding for fun for several hours a day every day. Proof of this forced subordination of female strength is seen in the female runners that were required to have their hormone levels altered because they run “too fast”. And those were cisgender women that this was done to. Still, keeping in mind that strength is not determined by gender or sex the differing socialization of the genders results in physical differences with current societal beliefs and I was socialized as a boy for a part of my life. Due to this I’ve spent many years making sure that I did not receive credit for being a girl rider because I didn’t want to make other women feel cheated, but after meeting, riding with, and talking to other woman and girl riders who so far with the exception of one, have been nothing but supportive of me riding I have come to accept that I too am what a woman rides like. The way gendering works means that people are socialized on the basis of their gender, not their sex so as a trans woman I’ve had to fight through much of the social barriers that cis women face with the added “bonus” of the always present threat of transmisogynistic violence which becomes more likely to happen the more I break out of traditional gender roles (e.g. being good at sports). A common thing for people to bring up against me is that I’m doing this just to get more attention or credit by riding as a woman but does anyone really think that I would subject myself to a life of being targeted by misogyny and transmisogyny just for a few seconds in the lime light? I ride as a woman because I am a woman.

The Florida BMX Park Series had its first girls’ class at the Merritt Island stop and every girl who competed asked me to ride. Originally I was going to hold back in the girls’ competition and do my best to beat up on the boys’ class but due to time constraints I could only enter one class. So we made the decision that I would enter the girls’ class because we needed as many of us entered as possible and I was still going to sandbag, but we [the competitors in the contest] got to thinking that if I’m watering down my riding to look more like a girl, what is that saying about girls’ riding? In the end I rode as best as I could, everyone had the time of our lives and we didn’t ride to compete, but to have a blast riding with our friends, and Ashley Haskett damn near beat me haha. I honestly didn’t know who won until they announced it and I think if Ashley had stuck pedals on her tailwhip she would have had it.

The big thing to realize here is that I’m not here to compete with other women and girls riding, I’m here to have fun on my bike and push the progression of women’s riding and our acceptance within the sport. BMX, especially freestyle, cannot be won and I think a big problem stems from female riders being pitted against one another as if there can only be one of us that’s the best in the world. Do people watch Dennis Enarson’s videos and Drew Bezanson’s videos and pit them against each other as if they’re competing for a prize? No, they watch both videos and get stoked because they both kick ass. That’s how it should be for women’s riding as well. So am I the best girl BMX rider ever? No, but that’s not because I’m not really a girl but because BMX is not a competition to win and beat people at.

Yeah I suppose that when we titled your video that way we kind of egged on the comparison between you and other female riders without realizing there was more to the situation. How has “coming out” in BMX compared to doing the same in the other areas of your life like with your friends and family?

It works out that you titled it that way though because the question mark left it open for me to answer haha. But yeah it peeves me when I see comments pitting us against each other. Divide and conquer I guess?

To be honest with you though I haven’t had the conversation with my family yet. I would be more surprised if nobody has told them already than if someone has at this point and there are a few people that have been doing their best to tell people about this that I’m not comfortable with knowing yet, but I might use this interview as my grand entrance, so to speak. I don’t have a clue how they’ll react but I can’t imagine that already being out to basically the entire BMX world will hurt any haha. It’s completely terrifying though. Coming out to people that I don’t know isn’t as bad because what they think of me doesn’t have much bearing on my life, but they can still create dangerous situations so it’s definitely not fun.

Then you add in the complete strangers that are coming to my defense (and some of them with really educated responses which means that they actually care) and it’s super easy to keep random people talking shit from getting to me. With people that I care about though, that’s another story. If they don’t respond well it really hurts. So close friends, family, people that I look up to, I’m petrified of telling them the first go. For the most part people have been supportive but every now and then I’ll get someone that meant a lot to me that I now have to cut out of my life and that feels like a sledgehammer to the gut.

Is there anyone who inspired you to come out and speak publicly about who you are?

There are a few people that inspired me to come out and a few people that encouraged and supported me to do it, and without them I wouldn’t have been strong enough to handle it. Way too many names to run through all of them and how much they did for me, but the three people that supported me the most are my best friends Katie Atkinson, Theresa Kruegar, and Betty White. It’s funny because with each and every one of them I was nauseatingly terrified to tell them but once I did they were perfect about handling it and have been there to support me so much.

The progression of women’s freestyle BMX being pushed by cisgender women is what made me comfortable with coming out in the BMX world. If I wasn’t 100% confident that there are other women who do more difficult tricks than I can I wouldn’t have done this. Looking at individual tricks in my edit, they’re nothing particularly special; it mostly gets its zazzle because of how I linked them together and being style conscious. Everything in my edit I have seen done by cis women except for maybe my speed in bowls (and I’m sure there’s at least one woman who can go that fast, I’m just not aware of them), but what do you expect to see from someone who’s raced for 15 years? If you compare the skills of riders who’ve been riding for a similar amount of time you’ll notice parallels regardless of their gender. Most of the top female athletes in freestyle BMX have not been riding as long as the top male athletes because we’re so barred from participating by unsupportive parents, not knowing that we can ride too due to a lack of representation, and backlash from other riders once we have picked up a bike, but we’re still compared to the best male athletes in the sport. I would be lying if I said that physical strength doesn’t play a huge role in making BMX easier, but it’s not the end all be all. Experience and mental outlook have a huge effect on what a rider can do. This is why telling someone that they can’t do something stunts their progression so much. I’ve been starstruck by riders like Angie Marino, Nina Buitrago, Camila Harambour, Joey Gough, and Peta Shepherd, just to name a few, for years and watching them bridge the gap between women’s and men’s riding has been truly inspirational because they’ve fought through being told that they can’t do what they do by a larger community to obtain their riding skills.

I’m a part of what I think is the middle generation of women riders, where we were told that we can’t but have had ladies that have done it before us to point to and say “Oh yeah?”. What I love about this is that we’re now seeing the first hints of a third generation of girl riders, seen in the likes of Hannah Roberts and Nikita Ducarroz (there are so many more but to keep this brief) who are absolutely killing it as a result of still being strong-minded individuals, but also getting positive reinforcement from other riders that they can shred. In any case being a female athlete means that you have to shove naysayers doubts back into their faces and shred anyways which is why I’m a huge fan of every woman and girl who picks up a BMX bike regardless of what they can do on it.

As far as inspiration goes, first and foremost is Laura Jane Grace from Against Me. I’d say the punk rock community is more similar to the BMX community than anything else with a prominent openly trans woman and seeing the positive reactions to her, how strong and brave she was, and how happy it made her really convinced me to be that inspiration for someone else. I always wished that I had a path to follow for coming out in the BMX community, someone that had done it before and someone who could show me what it would be like before I went through with it, but I got tired of waiting. I knew that there were more trans women that ride BMX and are just hiding like I was, but now I know for a fact that there are others and I figured one of us has to do it. This is a completely unblazed trail that no one has gone down before, so going public could either blow up in my face and I get harassed off the internet or it all works out and the BMX world is ready to accept us. Either way that it turns out I’m providing other trans BMX riders a gauge on how safe they are in BMX. I would much rather have this turn out to show them that they’re safe here though. At the end of the day we all love riding BMX and I’m not going to erase my identity to pursue my passions because it makes people uncomfortable. In the first riding clip of my edit I ask Betty, “Are you ready?” which is the big question that I hope this edit and interview answers, is BMX ready for a transgender woman rider? If not I’m here anyways and I’m not alone so deal with it haha.

The Come Up Interview 3

Yeah I was planning on bringing up the Against Me! comparison. They were huge in BMX during the early 2000s but I’m assuming a lot of riders don’t even know that the singer Laura has been living as a woman for the past year or so. It’s kind of shocking that it took this long for a high profile person in the punk scene to come out in this way since punk has always been associated with androgyny and politics. BMX on the other hand has never really had any sort of public discourse about sexuality. Are you scared of the reaction to this interview?

I mean, even with a progressive community you’ll always have shitbags so coming out is scary because historically it hasn’t been a safe thing to do. BMX has people from every walk of life participating so it’s tricky to gauge how this will go over, but I really hope that by starting this discussion we can change that culture of oppression and people who aren’t cisgender heterosexuals are safe to come out of hiding. I am pretty nervous about it because in a large group shitbags can do a lot of damage, but I have high hopes because for the most part people are supporting me and other trans women. After my edit was posted you’d get the occasional person talking shit only to have several others jump on them and call them out for it. When someone says something completely ignorant I just let em talk (seeing how many BMX movie titles I can name drop in here haha) because I don’t need to defend myself to them. They’re not interested in learning so when others call them out they look like a fool.

Who made the video for you? Were you trying to accomplish anything in particular with it?

The video was my welcome edit for Awarewolf Apparel which is a small clothing brand that has the same goals that I do. We want to make people aware of these topics and create a discussion on how to handle the issues that arise from how people react to them. I edited the video myself and it was filmed by my friends, random people that I convinced to point a camera at me, and a bit of self filming. That, combined with the Nikon CoolPix camera that I used to film it kept the production quality pretty low but that’s okay because I used punk rock as the sound track; it’s supposed to look shitty hahaha. At first it started out as a fun project to do with my friends. Betty White and I were both filming for our first edits at the same time and we became such good friends in the process. (go watch hers here by the way! Sorry had to throw that in there hahaha she’s my bestie.) I really wanted to push how much fun I was having filming for it because that’s what it was and is all about. After I started putting clips together though I realized that this could be an edit that inspires other women to shred and show everyone that we can ride just as hard as dudes. It was for all those dudes that compare edits from a girl who’s just started to guys who have been riding for years and put them down because they can’t get as steezetastic as they can. I want it to make those dudes cry when they have to compare a girl who’s been riding for years to themselves hahaha. Once I got the finished product though I knew it was going to get a fair amount of attention so it became the perfect opportunity for me to have a platform to speak to the BMX world that we all love riding BMX and if we could just respect each other while doing it that would be rad. I think I accomplished all these goals. In any case I had a wonderful time making it, a few women have told me that it inspired and motivated them, some dudebros have shed their tears, and I’ve got a chance to teach people about this stuff that normally wouldn’t have access to it, so thanks for that haha.

Coming away from this interview I really hope that people capitalize on this opportunity to learn about a subject that they might not have been exposed to before, and I’m always down to answer genuine questions that are asked in a respectful manner, but for the edit and my riding I don’t want there to be an asterisk attached to my name. I want my riding to be counted as female BMX accomplishments rather than being put into my own category where my riding doesn’t get to help push the progression of what women can do on a bike.

I guess I’d like to finish this just by thanking you for being willing to talk about this with me and TCU’s audience. It’s always hard being the first person through the wall and hopefully this can make BMX more accepting of people who don’t fit into traditional ideas about gender and sexuality. Is there anyone you’d like to thank or anything else you’d like to mention?

I told my friends that I’d ask if we could title this interview “The Come Out” hahaha. I probably just ruined everybody’s plans who wanted to make that joke. I really want to thank you for giving me the opportunity to talk about this stuff to such a broad audience. I think a lot of negativity is stemming from people that just don’t understand what’s going on so being able to clear things up for them should be really helpful. Thanks to everyone who’s watched shared and enjoyed my edit, super thanks to those who defend myself and other women from people talking shit about us in the comments, those who have provided support for me when I needed it, thanks to everyone who helped me film this, preemptive thanks to my parents for accepting that they actually have two daughters haha, and thanks to every woman and girl who’s picked up a bike and shredded the thing because we get a lot of flak for doing so but it’s certainly worth it. Keep your eyes peeled for more stuff from me in the future because there are loose plans in the works for a fun split edit with Betty and I once we’re not burnt out from the last ones as well as a few other projects and trips.

I would like to thank Chelsea for doing this interview. You can keep up with her on Facebook.

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180 thoughts on “Meet Chelsea Fietsgodin, The First Transgender BMX Rider.

  1. Awesome read. Seems like a very intelligent woman. And she rips on a bike. I have no problem with anyone wanting to ride BMX. Gender is not a factor and it shouldn't bug anyone. I feel like the only ones that would hate on her are the dudes that aren't as good as her.

  2. I am a guy who was raised by a girl to be a guy. My mom is amazing, shout out to her! I feel very privileged to have a strong emotional heart with a strong human body. Chelsea, keep shredding for all the beings on this planet!

  3. Definitely a good read with a solid interview. Props to her for doing it and tcu for posting it

  4. Good read, I think you'll be fine. There's always going to be some idiots talking shit but I think comparing BMX to football does it a disservice… For instance, there's quite a few openly gay high profile riders/ industry figures and they just came out without making a big deal about it and are getting on with their lives. Compare that to football (soccer) where there's been (I think) one openly gay player who had to deal with horrible chants and all the others don't dare come out.

  5. i'm not aware of any openly gay pro BMX riders or industry figures. and i agree that the reaction towards football players who have come out has been at times disgusting, but at least the dialogue is taking place. i think it would be great if a bunch of people commented some ignorant shit on this article, then at least we could give the issue some shine and show how baseless their arguments are.

  6. This is probably the best interview I've read on the come up. I am not transgender but I am gay and I feel I can relate to her because I often get mistaken as a guy but I am female!! Haha. Great read.

  7. The people I'm aware of aren't among the current 'big' names, but I don't get the impression they are doing any more 'hiding' of their sexuality over and above not talking about their private lives, which is something hardly any riders who get interviewed do anyway. I think we maybe skipped the drama part and are behaving like grown ups, but that might just be wishful thinking.

  8. Pete Greaves being private about your sexuality is fine if that's what you choose to do. but the fact that EVERYONE in bmx is ostensibly heterosexual is a problem in my mind. it's unrealistic and it leaves kids out who don't fit in. it's fine for adults to be quiet about their private lives and i'd love to see a day where being gay/trans is uninteresting enough that this interview seems silly but we're definitely not there yet.

  9. props to her. She is not the first transgendered BMX racer, there has been a woman out there for several years, and sadly she has endured nonstop harassment from what is a small but vicious group of ignorant women. A group of us usually look out for her at bigger nationals so she doesn't get Harassed. Hopefully interviews like this will help to decrease the poor behavior Behavior like that which my friend has to endure. and to their credit, USA BMX has been very adamant towards this group of women that they will not tolerate the harassment or the bullying with the name calling. so it's nice to see that the racing sanction is willing to stand behind the writer being harassed.

  10. Adam Grandmaison You make a good point there, I guess BMX is a sport which a lot of teenagers do and if you were coming to terms with your sexuality then it'd be good to have a few pros who you could relate to.

  11. This was a great read and I applaud Chelsea on who she is and the choices she made, but, although I like the more psycho philosophical approach to what it is that defines sex and gender, I feel there are some biologist out there who wouldn't wholeheartedly agree with the gender-spectrum concept mentioned in the first half of this interview. I hope I am not opening up cans of certain substance here, I just think we shouldn't neglect exact sciences in favor of popular broad-mindedness. Not saying A or B here – I am an absolute know-nothing on the field -, just urging people to read critically and think for themselves. Both on A and B.

  12. http://www.psmag.com/navigation/health-and-behavior/social-construction-sex-77099/
    There are some biologists that will disagree but they're wrong too. The ones that know what they're doing and focus on learning rather than binding themselves by sticking to what they think they know are the ones that I learned this from. Thinking for yourself results in realizing that binary biological sex is a social construct. Unquestioningly following the masses makes one think otherwise.

  13. Thanks for sharing that. Good read and clarifies a lot in the interview. What Alice tells me, however – the way I interpret it at least -, is that not the idea of binary biological sex in the strict anatomical sense is a social construct, but gender-role, -identity and expectations are.

  14. Both are actually social constructs. This isn't to say that they don't exist and aren't important, but they are a human creation. Blame it on western society's lust for simplicity I guess lol. Other cultures have actually had more than two gender possibilities but western imperialism wiped that out along with all of their other traditions

  15. I thought this was going to be a sort of "whoa is me" interview, but it was the complete opposite! It was more on the self empowerment side, and it was an excellent read! When I first saw her edit, it never crossed my mind that she was a dude, I just thought she killed it. I liked how positive she is, and her love for bmx no matter how awful people in the bmx community can me.

  16. You're awesome Chelsea! Excellent conversation, thanks for sharing, really great riding style too :) also, she mentions early in the interview independent BMX media outlets run by female riders, I'm interested in following if anyone has links to any of these they can share

  17. It was nice meeting/riding with you back in the casselberry days hope all is well, good read by the way hope to see ya around when im back in fla visiting.

  18. She still sucks too, its not like shes any good. Its a shame that this "girl" gets attention just for being transgendered when guys who are twice as good get no where. If you have a respose, post it in the comments to the youtube video. Ive been arguing with the retards on there for what feels like months.

  19. You know your comparing dudes to dudes here. Some guys are better than other guys, doesn't mean anyone is mad.

  20. I was born intersexed (both genders) and have been bangin' bars with m brother sense 4/77.
    Chelsea, you're awesome!
    Hope we compete together soon ether on the track or the park- I'm game

    Girls Rock!

  21. That's awesome. I'm stoked to have Chelsea as a part of the bmx community and hope to see more lgbt and girl riders shredding in the future. As long as you're riding and having fun, that's what fucking matters. That being said, I do think the issue of sexual dimorphism was underplayed in the conversation though. Sexual dimorphism is the phenotypical differences between sexes of a species, and we as humans are a sexually dimorphic species. While socialization does play a role in determining what traits a person might refine, it probably can't be scientifically supported that that is the only reason for these differences. Especially with topics such as strength: "aggregated data of absolute strength indicates that females have 40-60% the upper body strength of males, and 70-75% the lower body strength. The difference in strength relative to body mass is less pronounced in trained individuals. In Olympic weightlifting, male records vary from 5.5× body mass in the lowest weight category to 4.2× in the highest weight category, while female records vary from 4.4× to 3.8×"(http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Sexual_dimorphism#Humans).

  22. Love it. Wish I had been riding as hard as you when I was your age. Thanks for your bravery and keep it up! <3

  23. Agreed.

    I really, really, really wanted her friend (through unexplained reasons) to be Betty White from the Golden Girls, though. That was the only let-down. All of the positive comments on it are nice to see, too (which, the contrary occurrence typically seen on here is usually why I stay away).

  24. My number one irritation is when people are persecuted for being different, which is why I'm pretty excited for this interview because it really shows how many people in BMX are silenced for their sexuality. It's disgusting that we somehow feel the need to hurt others when we really don't have to. Hopefully now BMX will be looked upon a little more positively if we can stop hating a little bit.

  25. I was wondering when this kind of thing would come up in BMX, I would hope that, as a general group, we see no issue here. More women need to be in this, and she's an inspiration.

  26. you mad? cause youre not cool and famous like the cool and famous people? ride your bike and shut up.

  27. Pete Greaves Adam Grandmaison it's a shame the high profile gay rider felt he couldn't come out in his Albion interview

  28. That actually is the case lol. I'm the first openly trans woman that's willing to talk about this stuff and is well known enough for people to listen, but that article title didn't fit in the 80 character limit hahaha

  29. Great article but personally I don't see the logic in emphasizing on gender. BMX mostly tests skill (as opposed to road cycling), not physical strength, which is the only difference between genders.

    Considering girl riders a different 'class' only holds them back I think, as they don't have to pull up to the level of top male riders.

  30. Phenomenal! In a perfect world, wouldn't we not have to separate the men's riding and competitions from the women's? I mean, shouldn't that be the goal of a sport is that women's riding is so great and progressive that its not a sideshow of the sport but rather pushing it at the same level, where gender wouldn't have any relation to where a rider was in sport or competition?

    Well we're not there yet, but hopefully with riders like Chelsea it could happen someday. Chelsea Fietsgodin you're an incredible rider, and I hope you get stronger and keep pushing it! Huge Fan!

  31. BIG inspiration & STYLE 4 miles, keep on shredding & be this awesome. ONE love & BMX 4 life, WoooooW!!! :)

  32. I am happy this came out! I have read so many things in the need about transgender women being "cheaters". There was a specific case in a college basket ball team. I am not transgender an have had to take hormones for chronic disease reasons and I want any man saying it's cheating to realize hormones are no joke. They can mess with your body in a way that can make you feel sick and sometimes even weak. So imagine a young person taking these hormones (and way more than I even had to take) and transitioning into a woman. We naturally biologically born women already hit puberty and we get changes that don't affect us as it would a transgender. So she takes hormones to become a beautiful woman and she does it without nature's full help. Her body changed into a woman's body and to me that classifies this rider as a woman not a cheater. She struggled as a young person, got to struggle with hormones, and she has to deal with jerks telling her nasty things. I have never met you but I am proud of you. Standing up strong and empowering yourself against the mundane people who believe ou have to be this or that is a wonderful thing. It doesn't matter what a birth certificate seems you as because that doesn't define you. Have fun shredding girl!

  33. I am happy this came out! I have read so many things in the need about transgender women being "cheaters". There was a specific case in a college basket ball team. I am not transgender an have had to take hormones for chronic disease reasons and I want any man saying it's cheating to realize hormones are no joke. They can mess with your body in a way that can make you feel sick and sometimes even weak. So imagine a young person taking these hormones (and way more than I even had to take) and transitioning into a woman. We naturally biologically born women already hit puberty and we get changes that don't affect us as it would a transgender. So she takes hormones to become a beautiful woman and she does it without nature's full help. Her body changed into a woman's body and to me that classifies this rider as a woman not a cheater. She struggled as a young person, got to struggle with hormones, and she has to deal with jerks telling her nasty things. I have never met you but I am proud of you. Standing up strong and empowering yourself against the mundane people who believe ou have to be this or that is a wonderful thing. It doesn't matter what a birth certificate seems you as because that doesn't define you. Have fun shredding girl!

  34. You know I am happy you posted your comment bc to me you are a huge name in bmx and I feel if people can see someone like you who is a role model encourage this woman others will think before they speak. Please let her know as a fellow bmx rider I am glad to have her in WOMENS bmx an she is beautiful!

  35. ok to start the man really isnt that good second off shes not a fucking girl she has a dick fuck thats disgusting whats wrong with you poeple i dont expect you to treat her like shit but all these awesome cool she so good comments are pissing me off well if you think about if he was actually not a transgender and just a normal boy would she be on the come up hell fuck no dude are future is so fucked why cant people just be who they are but to wrap it up moral: just because a man trying to be a woman bikes shes on the come up ok shes the first transgender why do you have to share it all over ok a transgender rides a bike

  36. ok to start the man really isnt that good second off shes not a fucking girl she has a dick fuck thats disgusting whats wrong with you poeple i dont expect you to treat her like shit but all these awesome cool she so good comments are pissing me off well if you think about if he was actually not a transgender and just a normal boy would she be on the come up hell fuck no dude are future is so fucked why cant people just be who they are but to wrap it up moral: just because a man trying to be a woman bikes shes on the come up ok shes the first transgender why do you have to share it all over ok a transgender rides a bike

  37. Chelsea, you will see by my profile that I share your passion for bikes, even though my wheels are of a different genre. I'm 76, still ride in distance rides, and have twelve grandchildren. I will frame my comment as though you might be one of them. As a Christian, I might be expected to start preaching to you about your gender issues. That is not going to happen. I will instead congratulate you, not just for your amazing accomplishments in BMX, but for your courage in facing difficult and complicated circumstances head-on. All human life is complicated one way or another, and sorting it out takes a lifetime. There will always be close-minded haters, which you should do your best to ignore. They are not worthy of your time. By God's amazing grace, I am no longer of the diminished mindset that views a person who is different from me as someone to be judged. If you were in fact one of my grandchildren, I would encourage you to first be true to yourself. It takes a lifetime to discover who you truly are, but it only takes honest affirmation to discover who God is. He loves every one of us as though there were only one of us.

  38. If you read the article again you'll see that there are differences to gender in terms of entitlement etc. Some of the comments are a great example already

  39. Riding is riding, It doesn't matter how good you are or what gender you are. Quit being such a troll and let people that have a good story to share that involves inspiring more people to ride have the spot light. smh

  40. I feel like this may not be my place to chime in, but ive always been very interested i this kind of nature vs nurture argument, but really I'd just like to say that its a complicated subject and nobody can fully say they are right or wrong about it, but the most important part is asking why does it matter??
    You end up the way you are, for whatever reasons, and if someone wants to criticize you for that and try to blame it on this reason or that then that becomes the real problem in my eyes.
    Much respect for doing what youre doing, and even if your unique situation did have something to do with how good you are on a bike, why should anyone have a problem with that!
    Stay educated and happy and live your life, cant wait to see the next edit

  41. Great read, to be honest I did not read it all but it's still great. Way to be you Chelsea! Keep on shredding! Hey Jeanne give this a read!

  42. Fantastic read big up to her any one who talks shit is just an ignorant fool bmx is all about community and a shared interest for the love of the sport at the end of the day we have to support each other who ever we are and keep the bmx community together I'm bi sexual man never had any haters for it so hopefully people can move with the times and just ride have good times and street beers =D props to Chelsea

  43. Fantastic read big up to her any one who talks shit is just an ignorant fool bmx is all about community and a shared interest for the love of the sport at the end of the day we have to support each other who ever we are and keep the bmx community together I'm bi sexual man never had any haters for it so hopefully people can move with the times and just ride have good times and street beers =D props to Chelsea

  44. chelsea, i dont know if you remember me or not, but we grew up racing together, our dads were good friends. just wanted to stop by and let you know to keep kicking ass and being yourself.

  45. I believe your actually missing the point here. The way i read this article is that it aims to give the bmx community an insight to the views, experiences and difficulties of those who are discriminated against (for whatever reason)and therefore held back from doing what they enjoy. The bmx scene (and the whole world tbh) needs to be more accepting of people cause life is about doing what makes you happy. Maybe i view things in a different way to you as i have suffered a fair bit of discrimination in my time due to my race. I have to respect Chelsea for putting herself in the spotlight in order to get this point across. hopefully this article and any in the future will allow you and any other close minded people to become more accepting of other people and start to realize, its not what you are thats important, its who you are and what you do that is. bmx especially is about having fun and socializing, a person's race/gender/religion etc is not relevant
    I respect the fact that people are likely to disagree, but why should your views prevent someone from doing what makes them happy.

  46. Big up to Adam22 for such an awesome interview! Props to Chelsea fietsgodin for pulling off a better interview than most. And to all the butthurt bros in the comments, quit bitching about the whole TG thing… There's another chick on a bmx… Who cares of he is a she or she is a he or the lobster is turkey. We all ride bmx, with a bond tighter than any sport in the world, and when people start shitting on one another it keeps people from wanting to join In. Maybe stop showing off for the chick next door so you can get a hand job behind the shed… Teach her to ride and she might just be your new girl.

  47. good interview, I was already educated on this matter dude to fallon fox in mma, but I don't judge nobody(except kids who can do flairs, fuckem), i ride bikes to have hella good times

  48. I've always wanted to see a crew of BMX chicks, because that would just make my day a whole lot better, plus what would security think of girls shredding rails haha what you going to do ……..

  49. So obviously the reason this may be considered cheating is not a mental difference but a physical one…
    You see the differences in muscle structure of the upper body between man and woman is part of what makes bmx specifically more difficult for women, for example men have more abdominal muscle to work with due to lack of internal reproductive organs. it requires quite a bit of upper body and core strength (especially street), while in skateboarding you see women coming closer to the level of men all the time because it relies heavily on leg strength. (women typically have very strong legs)

    So really it takes longer for women to progress, because it requires the development of muscle memory which happens much faster in men due to high quantities of testosterone in the blood and other differences in hormones.
    Bottom line, women can reach a high level of riding, I have a massive amount of respect for women that get very good (perris benegas and nina butriago are prime examples) because it takes more time and more work.

    So we need to be kind and considerate to chelsea, but also consider that we must use discretion when comparing the riding itself to that of a natural woman.

  50. technically Chelsea is a male (I'm talking physically) so it's not really fair to actual female riders to compare her to girls. It's like Usain Bolt having a sex change and running in the Woman's 100m at the Olympics. I'm not going to deney that i find this flat out weird and personally i don't agree with it, but that's the beauty of personal liberty, your free to do what ever makes you happy without having to fear harm from other people. On the other hand i'm glad to have finally discovered another BMX rider who is doing a political science major, i though i was the only one haha.

  51. Yes I did. I never said that women couldn't be strong or good at riding, however The fact that Bmx requires many more areas of the body to build and learn at once than running, skateboarding or surfing, means that on average men have a Biological advantage because on average men have much higher testosterone levels, many female bodybuilders have used artificial testosterone for decades because it allowed them to build more muscle groups at once which is what bmx requires only on a larger scale. Of course a man with low testosterone will have less than a woman with above average levels, what I'm trying to explain is that women riding bmx is especially impressive and cool because it is difficult. How you fit in to all this I don't know, it's not my place to judge. but saying that women are the exact same as men and have no disadvantages is belittling and almost insulting the women who have put in the work and time to become the awesome riders they are today. So when the first women reach the level of current pros (I have no doubt that it will happen) you can bet your ass that I will be the first to stand up and cheer.

  52. "Average". This is assuming you know my testosterone levels and how they compare to the average. Whatever superpowers you have to be able to know this are neat but they're inaccurate apparently.
    And you mean steroids? BMX requires more muscles than body building? That's a way of looking at it. kind of. not really. but anyways.
    Women riding is impressive because of the stigma that we have to fight through in order to achieve our skills, which if you'd read the interview (and retained what you read) you'd have seen the part where that affects trans women as well. The point of this interview is that myself and other female riders have figured out where I fit into all of this and it is our place to judge.
    And again, you either didn't read the interview or you didn't comprehend what you read, because at no point did I say that we don't have any disadvantages.

  53. I've seen and I guess riden with her, seems laid back and down to earth. After reading this it just clarifies that she's badass and people should learn from her to not let people determine how you live! Only you put your pants on in the morning don't let other people determine what you should do in life .. Kinda blabbering there but she's badass and rides amazing mega props girl!

  54. The only fag here is Adam, and I say that in the most endearing way possible. Chelsea rips it hard and she deserves the recognition for her riding skills and not for our misconceived perception of how people need to look and act.

  55. You have my statement about bodybuilding backwards, bmx is on a smaller scale but similar in the amount of different muscle groups used, as far as this stigma you speak of I don't think it's as all encompassing and common as you make it sound, I can't help but think as though the majority of the bmx community is hyped on the idea of women in bmx… I'm not as impressed by someone who can "ignore the haters" so to speak as I am by someone who has overcome physical challenges. Now I don't know you, I'm not talking about you, I'm not trying to put you down in any way, what I'm saying is that men, who make up the majority of bmx, find women who ride impressive due to physical challenges being overcome because it directly effects the riding and that's all we care about. Now I'm glad you have supportive friends to help you find peace with wherever you want to be in bmx (and life for that matter) and more power to you, I'm only trying to explain a certain perspective on the subject of women in bmx. I'm sorry if I offended you, it was not intentional.

  56. I'm sure as a man you know so much about the extent of the stigma that women face in BMX. There is also a section in the interview that addresses the physical strength issue. A few sections actually because it's talked about from two different angles.

  57. I'm sure as a man you know so much about the extent of the stigma that women face in BMX. There is also a section in the interview that addresses the physical strength issue. A few sections actually because it's talked about from two different angles.

  58. I know that all of my riding buddies have no problems with women riding and know a female rider. And most Comments on female riding videos (As far as I've noticed) are positive aside from the usual dumb kid who thinks he's funny making a "get back in the kitchen" joke. So pardon me if I think bmx is made up of mostly good people.

  59. As a woman who's experienced and is friends with other women who've experienced how nasty the BMX community can get, I'm telling you you're wrong. This isn't a check on your character or anything, I'm just pointing out to you that you can't understand an experience that isn't yours.

  60. Gender, gender identification, and gender preference should never be points of concern within the riding community. The only thing that should be a concern is if you are still having fun on two wheels. Accept fellow riders for what they are, and as they are, if you do t like it you can go take up rollerblading.

  61. This is fucking stupid. Gender is classically defined as the difference between the two counter parts, which is completely based on ones reproductive organs. So what he likes tampons and talking in a high voice, hes still a dude, just a really really really really really really gay DUDE! Thats it. If it has a dick, its a guy. End of discussion. If he gets surgury and installs a vagina, then its a chick! Albeit a strange one.

  62. But he thinks hes a girl so technically speaking, the fact that he has a dick is apparently null and void, and he should compete in all the female contests and be held to the same standard as female riders! Makes sense if you stick your head up your ass and call yourself a progressive thinker.

  63. Not only are you wrong (what you think is gender is actually the definition of sex [which is also inaccurate]) but you're also very obsessed with my genitals. Like really obsessed. And it worries me. Do not fret for you will never have the honor of seeing me naked to know what kind of radness I've got going on down there.

  64. Eric Walker Born with a penis? Your a dude. This is how Biology works. Your genetic make up is male. I don't care what your screwed up brain is telling you what your "gender" is. But it is obvious that competing as a girl or even being put into the same bracket is out of the question, it is unfair to the girls that were born girls. (They have vaginas)

    You have your thoughts I have my thoughts, you are brainwashed by society, I am an independent free thinker. So since you need to "accept" everyone in the world now a days so no body cries. Start accepting my views before you go back to your brainwashed ones. Aka "keep an open mind" is what society will say. Accepting someone for who they are is not standing for the bullshit that they are selling. Because sorry but he still looks like a dude, and is nothing more than a drag queen.

  65. Eric Walker Born with a penis? Your a dude. This is how Biology works. Your genetic make up is male. I don't care what your screwed up brain is telling you what your "gender" is. But it is obvious that competing as a girl or even being put into the same bracket is out of the question, it is unfair to the girls that were born girls. (They have vaginas)

    You have your thoughts I have my thoughts, you are brainwashed by society, I am an independent free thinker. So since you need to "accept" everyone in the world now a days so no body cries. Start accepting my views before you go back to your brainwashed ones. Aka "keep an open mind" is what society will say. Accepting someone for who they are is not standing for the bullshit that they are selling. Because sorry but he still looks like a dude, and is nothing more than a drag queen.

  66. Right? I never really understood what it means to be transgender until Tom transitioned to Laura and recommended people who are confused read 'The Whipping Girl.' I have always respected what Tom wrote because of his passion and sincerity, so I followed my instincts and expanded my mind on the subject because I knew that regardless of whether it's Tom or Laura, that person's not going to lie to sell records. Glad I did, and glad to see more people like Chelsea taking the plunge and coming out in the open with who she is. Kudos.

  67. Chelsea Fietsgodin Just because you believe the lies you were brainwashed into thinking, doesn't make you a girl. You got a dick? Your a dude. Sex and Gender is based off of the tool in your tool box. Not something some scientists wanted to invent to make their poor kids not have hurt feelings.
    Disorders are made up, it is who believes them that makes them true. In turn you are believing your own lies. Because your brain is a perversion of reality.

    What is your last chromosome pair? XY = Male. How many pairs do you have? Probably not 23. See gender in YOUR world, is what you tell yourself you are. Guess what, you probably tell yourself your a goldfish too, but i don't see you swimming in water; because you don't have gills. And you can keep telling yourself a girl, but you aren't fooling anyone; you still look like a dude!

  68. Isn't one of the biggest fights going on in the world Freedom? Why not let her have the freedom to be a boy or girl? So what! It is ultimately her decision, and just because you disagree does not make it wrong. Power on sister! You are seriously amazing on that bike and I support you in your ventures! xo

  69. Winter Rose Beaudry and your still calling him a her. The thing is that you don't know what freedom is. Freedom to be a human is everyone's right, freedom to claim your something your not; thats called lying. People always try to not hurt anyones feelings in situations now a days. And that's your route.

    There is no freedom of speech anymore, but there is freedom to opinion. My opinion is for a dude to quit with the lies to yourself and to others. There are two facts here that are not left to a psychologist, this kid was born with a penis, this kid's DNA will say Male. Lies make up todays "genders."Just because your in denial over facts, means you are a believer in the same fallacy.

  70. Winter Rose Beaudry and your still calling him a her. The thing is that you don't know what freedom is. Freedom to be a human is everyone's right, freedom to claim your something your not; thats called lying. People always try to not hurt anyones feelings in situations now a days. And that's your route.

    There is no freedom of speech anymore, but there is freedom to opinion. My opinion is for a dude to quit with the lies to yourself and to others. There are two facts here that are not left to a psychologist, this kid was born with a penis, this kid's DNA will say Male. Lies make up todays "genders."Just because your in denial over facts, means you are a believer in the same fallacy.

  71. You rock. Your video edits were pretty cool just bmx and fun with your friends that's what it is about. My lazy but needs to get back on my bmx bike. Nice interview and keep shredding

  72. Adam Grandmaison I hope you'll now assist with attempts to restrict the now common place 'no homo' comments constantly thrown in at the end of many conversations, you know, seeing as you helped get it out there in the first place….

  73. Chelsea Fietsgodin what because I'm not a forward progressive thinker like yourself? Believe your lies and keep getting brainwashed; since someone isn't independent enough from the world to have their own brain.

  74. Carl Espy Because you think that unquestioningly accepting and promoting the status quo is some revolutionary thing that makes you special. The reason that this is getting attention is because I'm fighting against what our society is designed to brainwash us into believing. You're so far down the rabbit hole that you think following the status quo is rare and difficult to do when it's literally the opposite.

  75. Carl is the man and knows whats up. I know theres more of you out there that think this is ridiculous. but you're all too scared to say anything. Fuck your political correctness. If it has a dick, its not a chick.

  76. Alright, delete my comments. Real mature. Im not the keyboard warrior type, but all of this ignorance is forcing this out of me. Chelsea, society has brainwashed nobody as to the question of ones assigned gender, NATURE has dictated gender (aka: Sex) for as long as two-part reproducing species have been around. And yes, gender and sex are the same thing. Accusing the opposing party of "being down a rabbit hole" does not count as an intellectual point, you are grasping at straws and taking shots at anybody who's opinion you feel threatened by. And as to the matter of me "being obsessed with your genitals", that is another attempt at nullifying my point by insinuating that I am some sort of pervert. Which is pathetic. I would be much more likely to empathize with your situation if you had the common courtesy to debate or at least converse without reverting to name calling, and implying that everybody who doesnt side with you are "assholes" or ignorant. Carl is not simply unquestioningly accepting and promoting a "status quo", he is stating biological fact. Either you have XX chromosomes, or you have XY chromosomes. End of story. That is his point. Another issue I have is that you are extremely vague as to your situation, saying you were "born to be a girl" which gives the impression that you were born with a vagina, when in fact, if that was true we would not be having this discussion. And as to the matter of you being a hermaphrodite, you neither confirm nor deny any such claim, so I assume you were not born as one. So in the end, you were born as a dude, and as such you should not be submitting videos under the guise of being a female rider. Thats all it really comes down to. Argue that gender doesnt matter when it comes to riding, but that is not a wise debate on your part. That is all the issue is here. You were born with a dick, you cant pretend to be a girl in any athletic pursuit. Thats it, thats the whole issue at hand. I could care less about the ethics or what caused you to end up like this. At the end of the day, its not fair for you to call yourself a girl when you are on your bike. You might be a great person, you might be the coolest thing since sliced bread. But you still shouldnt lie and say you are something you are not. Honesty is the best policy.

  77. ok, first off biological sex is a thing, it's how we as a species reproduce, and just because classifying sex isn't always easy and that once in a while intersex people (who can't reproduce) come along, that doesn't make it a spectrum.

    secondly – as a biologically male person your physical strength advantages over females are numerous: less bodyfat, taller, muscle mass, etc. sure hrt can alter that, but compared to an average sized female you will still have a huge advantage.

    thirdly – that doesn't even really matter, cos as i'm sure y'all are dying to tell me there are strong women, tall women, etc. no, what matters most is the fact that at birth you were assigned a gender that told you from the moment you could crawl you were stronger, faster, braver, smarter than any female. it doesn't matter whether you identified as male or not – male was what other people saw and that was the message you received. that's male privilige toots – and you have a metric fuckton of it.

    http://www.slideshare.net/EMMACNYC/delusions-of-gender-delusions-of-difference

    ps – that all said i hope transition makes your life more bearable, everyone deserves to be happy

  78. ok, first off biological sex is a thing, it's how we as a species reproduce, and just because classifying sex isn't always easy and that once in a while intersex people (who can't reproduce) come along, that doesn't make it a spectrum.

    secondly – as a biologically male person your physical strength advantages over females are numerous: less bodyfat, taller, muscle mass, etc. sure hrt can alter that, but compared to an average sized female you will still have a huge advantage.

    thirdly – that doesn't even really matter, cos as i'm sure y'all are dying to tell me there are strong women, tall women, etc. no, what matters most is the fact that at birth you were assigned a gender that told you from the moment you could crawl you were stronger, faster, braver, smarter than any female. it doesn't matter whether you identified as male or not – male was what other people saw and that was the message you received. that's male privilige toots – and you have a metric fuckton of it.

    http://www.slideshare.net/EMMACNYC/delusions-of-gender-delusions-of-difference

    ps – that all said i hope transition makes your life more bearable, everyone deserves to be happy

  79. Chelsea Fietsgodin dreger is a tireless campaigner for intersex rights and should applauded for that, but you can't take information from a class of people that are subjected to all kinds of nontypical medical attention from birth and claim it reveals something about the wider non-intersex population. if you're interested in brain organisation theory and all the variations thereof – try reading brainstorm by rebecca jordan young

  80. Im completely sure you didnt reade the whole interview! And stop judge how girls can ride compared to guys because I'm pretty sure that some girls are better than you on you bike! For sure I know so many girls who kill it and have more skills on their bike than guys…

  81. Riiiiight, so instead we're going to take the word of people who've never been forced to think critically about the subject. Good plan.
    We all receive the same faulty medical care, it just happens to disproportionately negatively affect trans and intersex people. And I don't know enough about being intersex to be a "tireless campaigner for intersex rights". Or did you think that intersex and transgender means the same thing?
    Also I checked out your page to make sure that I was right about you not knowing shit, and you need to get the fuck out of here with calling Ryland's parents child abusers because they're one of the few cis parents that don't cause extreme emotional trauma by abusing their trans child and one of the few that's not actively contributing to gender based oppression.

  82. Sarah, you make me wonder if you read my comments or are just assuming that I'm hating. I personally know a girl who rides transition quite a bit better than myself, what I'm saying is that I have more respect for a girl that rides at a fairly high level, than a guy at the same level because it took more work to get there.

  83. Attempting to say that differences in strength are due to socialization, and that being born a man doesn't come with a big difference in muscle and bone structure is belittling to your comrades like sarah here. Your comparison to Stevie is unrealistic because most people don't have muscle mass like he does, besides he's been doing hop 180's and 3's since he was a little kid, a much more realistic comparison would be someone with a more similar history like tom Dugan or Chase hawk (years of racing, rides mostly transition) then the physical similarities are quite apparent. The difference in skeletal structure plays a large role as well, do you know why female professional baseball pitchers throw underhand? (the windmill as some call it) because the bone structure in the shoulder makes throwing overhand at very high speed very difficult and potentially injuring. There are undeniable differences scientifically between being born a man and being born a woman. However if the women you ride with don't care about them then neither should you, but don't try to say they don't exist or are forced on people by society.

  84. You know that thing that you're doing where you're speaking over women on women's issues? You need to stop. Do not tell us what is belittling when the people that you think you're "protecting" (see: white knighting section in the interview and why the very basis of you disagreeing is oppressive) have stated that that very section empowered them.
    And funny thing on your baseball reference: you proved my point. Women are forced to throw that way by league rules that are in place because men say exactly what you just regurgitated. I'm guessing you've never heard of Jackie Mitchell (because weak men don't want you to know about her) who struck out Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig in her first major league game, only to have her contract voided the following week, with the men responsible for this decision citing that baseball is "too strenuous for women". More like men are weak and can't compete with superior female talent.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jackie_Mitchell

  85. Talk about not reading a word I said, everything you've said has been addressed and debunked in the interview. You should maybe check it out. I know it's hard to find but if you take your little scroll wheel and go up I promise it's there.
    and no boy is worth my time soooo

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